Taylor & Francis Group Awards Full-Service Production for Global Journal Content to Cenveo

Cenveo’s Technological Innovation Aligns With Taylor & Francis’ Journal Publishing Vision

Cenveo announces a major increase in full-service content production for Taylor & Francis’ global journal production program. Taylor & Francis selected Cenveo as a core content service provider to support Taylor & Francis’s continued growth.

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As a world-leading academic and professional publisher, Taylor & Francis cultivates knowledge through its commitment to quality. Taylor & Francis identified in Cenveo a shared vision to develop production workflows designed to improve the velocity of research dissemination. This planned strategic initiative enhances customer experience for Taylor & Francis' contributor base, particularly newer generations of researchers and scientists, without alienating its traditional market.

“The critical piece that convinced us Cenveo was the right partner was their technology stack supports our publishing model and provides real-world, expedited publication turnaround times using AI and natural language processing technology,” explains Stewart Gardiner, Global Production Director of Journals at Taylor & Francis Group. “The organizational and operational innovations Cenveo proposed to support a rapid scale-up in production volumes were something we haven’t seen from other providers and were clearly based on lessons learned in previous ramp-ups.”

In February 2018, Cenveo announced a financial restructure and reorganization to strengthen its fiscal health. Mr. Gardiner remarks, “Given the company is currently reorganizing following a Chapter 11 process, our legal and financial people looked at Cenveo closely and came to the view that this is a relatively straightforward debt for equity restructure. Refinancing of this sort is not out of line with what one might expect for a company in Cenveo’s market position, scale, and acquisition history.”

Cenveo and Taylor & Francis have shared a long work history prior to this fivefold increase in volume. The transition process has already begun and onboarding the additional Taylor & Francis work is scheduled to take place in structured phases throughout the remainder of 2018.

Given the company is currently reorganizing following a Chapter 11 process, our legal and financial people looked at Cenveo closely and came to the view that this is a relatively straightforward debt for equity restructure. Refinancing of this sort is not out of line with what one might expect for a company in Cenveo’s market position, scale, and acquisition history.
— Stewart Gardiner, Global Production Director of Journals, Taylor & Francis Group

“This major win is a result of considerable work and effort that we have put into the next generation of Smart Suite combined with a focus on operational excellence,” explains Atul Goel, EVP Global Content Operations and President and COO of India Operations at Cenveo. “We are grateful for the trust placed in Cenveo by Taylor & Francis and heartened that Cenveo’s long-term vision of innovative publishing workflows aligns with a global leader in publishing.”

Cenveo is consistently rated as one of the highest performing content service providers by its customers. Cenveo’s ongoing commitment to publishers and extensive experience with volume ramp-up is further demonstrated by its significant investments in technology and staff.

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Mike Groth

Michael Groth is Director of Marketing at Cenveo Publisher Services, where he oversees all aspects of marketing strategy and implementation across digital, social, conference, advertising and PR channels. Mike has spent over 20 years in marketing for scholarly publishing, previously at Emerald, Ingenta, Publishers Communication Group, the New England Journal of Medicine and Wolters Kluwer. He has made the rounds at information industry events, organized conference sessions, presented at SSP, ALA, ER&L and Charleston, and blogged on topics ranging from market trends, library budgets and research impact, to emerging markets and online communities.. Twitter Handle: @mikegroth72

Publishing Defined: What is Open Peer Review?

 

This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting talks about the different types of Open Peer Review. John recently published a new book titled "Scholarly Publishing: A Primer." 

 

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Mike Groth

Michael Groth is Director of Marketing at Cenveo Publisher Services, where he oversees all aspects of marketing strategy and implementation across digital, social, conference, advertising and PR channels. Mike has spent over 20 years in marketing for scholarly publishing, previously at Emerald, Ingenta, Publishers Communication Group, the New England Journal of Medicine and Wolters Kluwer. He has made the rounds at information industry events, organized conference sessions, presented at SSP, ALA, ER&L and Charleston, and blogged on topics ranging from market trends, library budgets and research impact, to emerging markets and online communities.. Twitter Handle: @mikegroth72

Innovative Research and Creative Output: From Ideas to Impact

Society for Scholarly Publishing - Philadelphia Regional Event

This post is a collaboration between SSP members, including Nicola Hill, Emma Sanders, and Adrian Stanley.

Left to right: Kathi Martin, Drexel Digital Museum; Jen Grayburn, CLIR Postdoc; Alex Humphreys, JSTOR Labs

On October 30th, the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) hosted a regional event at the University of Pennsylvania, Van Pelt Library. The topic, "Innovative Research and Creative Outputs: From Ideas to Impact" brought together Philly-area publishers, librarians, and content professionals for a panel discussion on new and innovative methods of producing scholarship.

Jen Grayburn, CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow

Jen spoke about her use of Google Scholar, SketchFab and Unity in her work, which centers around the intersection of architecture and text. Using GIS (Geographic Information Systems) mapping software, Jen examines locations of historic sites. She shared an example of a mapping she did of St. Magnus Cathedral in the islands off the north coast of Scotland. In this particular example, Jen generated a binary map that  indicated what would and wouldn’t be visible on the ground from a certain height.

She uses geo-TIFs (TIF files encoded with geographical coordinates) to create a 3D topographic map to illustrate what is visible and why. Eventually, these mappings were confirmed with on-site visits she conducted. In her work, Jen uses Sketchfab to store the large 3D modeling files

Currently, there is a lack of standards around 3D scholarly outputs—how they’re reviewed, stored, and made accessible.3D collections are siloed by institution—there is really no repository. The only exception Jen cites is Duke University’s MORPHO SOURCE. For these reasons, evaluating and citing digital work is still a challenge.

Studies in Digital Heritage content are inextricably linked to the 3D model created in the course of those studies. There is a real need for community standards for 3D data presentation. Academic departments are generally slow to reward digital projects, or have a process for incorporating these scholarly outputs in formal evaluations.

Archeologists with an interest in Jen’s work, for example, always want the original 3D model she created, not the version on Sketchfab. But these models haven’t been peer-reviewed, and for that reason, Jen is reluctant to provide. In the near future, more standard development and community standards for 3D and VR creation and curation in higher education is certainly warranted.

Kathi Martin, the Drexel Digital Museum Project

Kathi Martin  presented her work with The Drexel Digital Museum Project: Historic Costume Collection (digimuse)---a searchable image database comprising select fashion from historic costume collections. Initially, fashion images were highly protected by using low-res images and watermarked images on the website. Kathi explained that Polish hacktivists demonstrated to her how easy it is to remove the watermark and improve resolution.

The museum has always been driven by open access and open source to share information and further usage and research. Interoperability is key to the museum’s mission—this allows the data on the museum’s website to be easily harvested across browsers.

The museum has widened beyond Drexel’s collection; for example, Iris Barre Apfel’s Geoffery Beene collection was displayed and that exhibit is archived on the museum site. Quicktime VR was used to film the collection and provide high-resolution captures of the fashion collections.

The technology DigiMuse is used in the Drexel project and provides a new level of engagement with the collections Kathi is preserving. Drexel's Digital Museum project website allows a site visitor to interact personally and actively with a distributed, collected narrative. The site includes rich metadata descriptions for every picture. The variety of contributions on the site, Kathi feels, stimulate varying and often deeply personal reactions.

She believes the site is very powerful due to its “baked-in connectedness.” Kathi closed with Grace Kelly’s gown, made by Givenchy in part out of actual coral (gasp!). The site complements the high-res images of the gown itself with media of Grace Kelly in the gown.

Alex Humphreys, JSTOR Labs

Alex discussed how JSTOR Labs applies methods and tools from digital scholarship to create tools for researchers, teachers, and students "that are immediately useful – and a little bit magical." JSTOR is a member of ITHAKA, a non-profit devoted to digital sustainability.

Alex Humphreys, director at JSTOR LaBs

Alex works with a team of five on innovative projects that benefit humanities scholars. He demonstrated JSTOR Labs’ Understanding Shakespeare tool, which uses the Folger Shakespeare Library’s digital version of Shakespeare plays to hyperlink each line of the play to a search showing all JSTOR articles that contain a particular line of prose. 

JSTOR Labs works from a philosophy of play—Alex sees what resources other organizations (like Folger Shakespeare Library) bring, what LABS brings, and what kind of sandbox they might build in collaboration. Part of JSTOR Labs’ philosophy values what Alex calls “multi-disciplinarity.” For example, JSTOR Labs’ partnership with Eigenfactor (which measures influential and highly cited articles) has resulted in a tool that helps scholars discover the most influential articles in a given field or topic area. 

JSTOR Labs also believes in hypothesis-driven development. Alex explained the key is ITERATING, ITERATING, INTERATING! Alex also presented the topic modeling examples, including Reimagining the Monograph, which started from JSTOR Labs asking, "Can we improve the experience and value of long-form scholarship?"

The “topicgraph” provides a fingerprint of a monograph. Each term has a set of associated keywords, containment of which in the text make the probability higher that the term is being discussed. 

Last but certainly not least, Alex unveiled am amazing and brand new tool with the working name “Text Analyzer.” This tool is essentially a multi-language analyzer—text can be pulled from, say, a Russian Wikipedia entry. The tool will translate the text and list in English the topics included in the entry. 

Alex notes that so much of digital humanities is about probabilities, not known data. The label modelling that JSTOR Labs most frequently uses (as opposed to cluster topic modeling).


The Philadelphia SSP Regional Meetings are an excellent venue to engage with the scholarly and scholarly publishing community. All are welcome. To learn more, click here!

 
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Mike Groth

Michael Groth is Director of Marketing at Cenveo Publisher Services, where he oversees all aspects of marketing strategy and implementation across digital, social, conference, advertising and PR channels. Mike has spent over 20 years in marketing for scholarly publishing, previously at Emerald, Ingenta, Publishers Communication Group, the New England Journal of Medicine and Wolters Kluwer. He has made the rounds at information industry events, organized conference sessions, presented at SSP, ALA, ER&L and Charleston, and blogged on topics ranging from market trends, library budgets and research impact, to emerging markets and online communities.. Twitter Handle: @mikegroth72

Accessibility for Journal Publishers

The terms “access” and “scholarly journals” are often linked to Open Access publishing. Less often discussed—but still very important—are issues and challenges of making journal content accessible to the visually, cognitively, or otherwise impaired.

Guest blog by John Parsons


content accessibility for journal publishers

Peer-reviewed, scholarly journals are a specialized slice of the publishing universe. Worldwide, it is a $25 billion market. Unlike consumer and trade magazines, journals are not supported by advertising revenue, but rely on subscriptions, institutional funding, and/or open access funding mechanisms. Readership varies widely in size and scope, and includes students, journalists and government employees as well as researchers themselves. They are also delivered by a wide array of specialized digital platforms and websites.

What they do share with other publications is the assumption that their audience can read words and images on a page or screen. For the majority of journal readers, this poses few problems. However, for readers with visual or other impairments, content accessibility is a major concern.

Justifying Journal Content Accessibility

Some might argue, without foundation, that scholars qualified to consume peer-reviewed content are less likely to be impaired in the first place, making the number of affected users too low to justify the added costs. (If cost were the only issue, one Stephen Hawking in a journal’s potential audience would more than justify the cost of making scholarly exchange possible for disabled readers. Also, as was mentioned, scholars and researchers are not the only readers in the equation.)

In other words, one justification for accessibility is a moral argument. It’s simply the right thing to do. However, for most journals, this argument is moot. Government-funded research typically carries minimum accessibility requirements, such as those spelled out in U.S. Code Section 508.

Building content accessibility into a journal workflow need not even be a daunting financial question at all. Well-structured XML content and metadata has many benefits, of which accessibility is only one. (This will be the subject of another blog.)

Regardless of the reason, most journal publishers understand the why aspect of content accessibility. So, let’s focus on how best to do it.

Identifying the Pieces---WCAG 2.0, Section 508, and VPAT

To understand the scope of journal article accessibility, we need to know that it has two basic versions—a document (PDF or EPUB) and a webpage. These are similar in many ways, especially to a sighted person, but they have different accessibility requirements.

What each of these formats have in common are

  • accessibility metadata
  • meaningful alt text for images (including math formulas and charts)
  • a logical reading order
  • audible screen reading
  • alternative access to media content

Only two (EPUB and webpages) have potentially resizable text and a clear separation of presentation and content. (PDF’s fixed page and text size often can be problematic. But in areas where PDF is a commonly used format, notably healthcare, service providers can provide workflow mechanisms to remediate PDFs for Section 508 compliance.)

Webpages have the added requirements of color contrast, keyboard access, options to stop, pause, or hide moving content, and alternatives to audio, video, and interactive content. Most of these are covered in detail in the W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 guidelines, many of which are federally mandated. Service provider solutions in this area include a Voluntary Product Accessibility Template (VPAT) for journal content. This template applies to all “Electronic and Information Technology” products and services. It helps government contracting officials and other buyers to evaluate how accessible a particular product is, according to Section 508 or WCAG 2.0 standards.

There are several “degrees of difficulty” when it comes to making journal articles accessible. Research that is predominantly text is the easiest, but still requires careful thought and planning. With proper tagging of text elements, clearly denoting reading order and the placement of section headings and other cues, a text article can be accessibility-enhanced by several methods, including large print and audio.

More difficult by far are the complex tables, charts, math formulas, and photographic images that are prevalent in STM journals. Here, extra attention must be paid to type size and logical element order (for tables). In the case of charts, formulas, and pictures, the answer is alternative or “alt” text descriptions.

Think of it as explaining a visual scene to someone who is blindfolded. Rudimentary alt text, like “child, doll, hammer,” would probably not convey the full meaning of a photograph depicting Bandura’s famous Bobo Doll experiment. Rather, the best alt text would be a more nuanced text explanation of what the images depict—preferably by a subject matter expert.

Automation in Workflow is Key

When Braille or even large print were the only solutions, journal content accessibility was not an option for most. All that changed, for the better, with the advent of well-structured digital content. Again, publishing service providers have done much to advance this process, and in many cases, automate it.

Not every issue can be automated, however. Making content accessible may involve redesign. For example, footnotes may need to be placed at the end of an article—similar to a reference list—to ensure continuity of reading. Other steps support the logical flow of content and reading order, semantic structuring for discoverability, inclusion of alt text descriptions for images, simplifying presentation and tagging of complex tabular data, and the rendering of math equations as MathML.

Journal publishers can facilitate this in part by selecting formats that are more accessible by nature. Articles published online or available as EPUB are accessible by default, although they need to be enhanced to meet all the requirements of WCAG 2.0. The gap is small and can be easily bridged by focusing on the shortcomings and addressing it in design, content structuring, and web hosting.

Many of the basic, structural issues of making journal content accessible can be resolved, more or less automatically, if the publishing system or platform enforces standardized metadata rules. Titles, subheads, body copy, and other text elements will have a logical order, and can easily be presented in accessible ways. For elements where knowledgeable human input is required (as with alt text), a good system will facilitate such input.

Accessibility is not just the right thing to do, for the sake of science. It is also an obtainable goal—with the right service provider.

 


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Mike Groth

Michael Groth is Director of Marketing at Cenveo Publisher Services, where he oversees all aspects of marketing strategy and implementation across digital, social, conference, advertising and PR channels. Mike has spent over 20 years in marketing for scholarly publishing, previously at Emerald, Ingenta, Publishers Communication Group, the New England Journal of Medicine and Wolters Kluwer. He has made the rounds at information industry events, organized conference sessions, presented at SSP, ALA, ER&L and Charleston, and blogged on topics ranging from market trends, library budgets and research impact, to emerging markets and online communities.. Twitter Handle: @mikegroth72